Rachel Probert's CRA-W Experience

Distributed Mentor Project @

Home
Weekly Journal
Projects
Non-Photorealistic Rendering (NPR)
Recreation

NPR

Non-Photrealistic Rendering (NPR) is the way that graphics hardware, guided by software, draws pictures on your screen. The polygons, some generated on your Graphics Processing Unit and some by Software are passed to buffers which render them on screen. Before it is complete however, silhouettes and other shadows must be drawn. Much of the current research in this area focuses on how to choose the shadows to be drawn. The most successful Rendering software has won an Academy Award! “for significant advancements to the field of motion picture rendering as exemplified in Pixar’s RenderMan™.” the Pixar site discusses their RenderMan software and the movie-making process they designed.

Related Readings

This is only a partial list of the papers I have read, it may grow as more become internet ready.

Bruce and Amy Gooch's work is cited repeatedly as a way to find and render silhouettes.There is also some interesting collaborative work done with other Research Scientists and Proffesors at 'The U', take a look at Interactive Technical Illustration . Their book, Non-Photorealistic Rendering is a good place to begin reading on the basics of NPR.

Ramesh Raskar is well-known for the ideas he has put forward, I thought his Hardware Support for Non-Photorealistic Rendering was highly creative.

Cassidy Curtis - He has come up with a way of rendering which conveys much more than a plain old photo! Check out his Loose and Sketchy Animation page.

Jarek Rossignac is the earliest paper I've read on z-buffers, this hardware is now standard on quality Graphics Processors Units (GPU's). Here is a summary of his contributions(pdf).

Aaron Hertzman has done a lot of research, so far I've read Intro to 3d Non-Photorealistic Rendering.

 

Home
Weekly Journal
Projects
Non-Photorealistic Rendering (NPR)
Recreation

This site last updated: July 10, 2002

My Website @ Mills

rprobert@mills.edu